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QuickBooks Pro Features Explained

Hey Everyone

Back in July 2010, we introduced QuickBooks Pro integration, which allowed users to export their expenses directly into their QuickBooks Pro account. Once a user imported their .IIF file with their expenses into QuickBooks Pro, the expenses showed up as a ‘New Bill.”

This kind of support was OK for companies who didn’t really know what accounting procedure they wanted to use for tracking expenses, but the method left out advanced expense-tracking procedures that seasoned QuickBooks Pro users craved for.

Well, now we’re happy to say that we’ve broadened our support to handle the three most popular ways to import expenses into QuickBooks Pro:

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(1) EXPENSE TRACK VIA WRITE CHECK

For small companies that have employees paying out-of-pocket for T&E and then getting reimbursed via paper check after-the-fact, a very simple way to reimburse those employees is to go to Banking->Write Check, and simply cut a check to the employee for the sum total of their expenses (say for $100.00) and then fill in the line items that sum up to that total so that the individual expense accounts (such as Meals & Entertainment, Travel, Incidentals, etc) have a running total of spend therein.

A few useful notes:

(a) We allow users to configure what account the checks are written from (e.g., “Bank of America Checking Account”).  This can be configured via the ProOnGo Web Portal->Settings->QuickBooks.  Default is “Checking Account”.

(b) Field 1 in ProOnGo is used as the expense account name so that the check is backed up by itemized expense account line items that sum to the total of the reimbursement.

(c) The “Client” field in ProOnGo flows through to the “Customer:Job” field in QB Pro.  Useful for companies that pass expenses through to clients or run reports to determine profitability of each client (not unusual).

(2) EXPENSE TRACK VIA CREDIT CARD  

Some companies prefer to think of their employees’ reimburseable expenses as a virtual “credit card”.  I.e. the employee is making purchases and the company owes the employee the sum total of those purchases as a reimbursement.

In this line of thinking, the employee “is” the credit card.  Users label their expenses using:

  • Field 1 (Category) to specify the expense accounts against which the employee spent.
  • Field 3 (Client) to flow into QB Pro’s “Customer:Job” field
  • Field 4 (Payment Type) in ProOnGo Expense to indicate the Credit Card account name

So, a Credit Card account might be named “Max Reimbursements”, and would accumulate line items of expenses incurred by Max. Then, on some agreed rhythm, the QB administrator cuts Max Schmidt a check for the running total sitting on that “credit card” for that expense category and/or project.

(3) EXPENSE TRACK VIA VENDOR BILLS

Some companies treat their employees as Vendors, when it comes to expense reimbursement.  For example, if Max buys 3 computers on his personal credit card, and the company has agreed to reimburse him for buying these for the office, the QB admin could go to Vendor->Enter Bills and create a “bill” from Max Schmidt, billing the company for the total cost of those 3 computers.  The QB Admin could then go to Vendors->Pay Bills to issue a check to Max Schmidt for the total amount of those 3 computers.

This is the 1 style of QB Pro export that we’ve supported to-date.  Support has now been improved, though.

ProOnGo’s Field 3 (Client) now flows through to QB’s “Customer:Job”.  This is important if Max purchased these computers for work on a particular client and I pass the expenses through to that client (while simultaneously reimbursing Max), OR if I use any of the QB reports that track profit/loss on a per-client basis.

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